Last Update: 15/07/2017 09:20 AM

SBI PO Prelims Exam Analysis 2017 (7th May 2017) - Expected Cutoff

SBI PO Prelims Exam Analysis 2017

SBI PO Preliminary Exam Analysis (7th May 2017): Hello Readers, As you all know that India’s largest public sector bank i.e. State Bank of India is recruiting for 2403 Probationary Officers for the year 2017. Becoming an SBI Probationary Officer is a dream of every banking aspirant as it is the most prestigious job profile among all the banks.

All banks including SBI nowadays follow a three stage recruitment process for probationary officers.

The SBI PO recruitment preliminary exams have been started from 29th April and we are here to discuss 7th May Exam. Here, we are going to describe the SSC PO 2017 Prelims exam Analysis on 7th May.

SBI PO Prelims Exam Analysis 2017: 7th May 2017

English

The English section of this exam is conducted for 30 marks and it consists of 30 Questions. In today’s exam, questions were asked from the following topics:-

  • Reading Comprehension: 10 Questions – Easy to Moderate level. Antonyms and synonyms asked were easily doable. Antonyms : Sophisticated, Hafty & Synonyms : Employs, Ubiquitous
  • Close Test- 10 Questions- Easy to Moderate level. Cloze test was easy based on working and nonworking people
  • Sentence Correction- 10 Questions- Easy to Moderate level.Mainly Errors of Prepositions, conjunctions, and tenses were pointed out

As we can see only three topics are being asked since last year’s paper so, you have to practice these topics broadly. Also, RC and close test are based on technology and economy, so you should practice recent editorials based on technology and economy from news papers.

Following are the RC and close test asked in today’s first slot:

Reading Comprehension

OVER a couple of days in February, hundreds of thousands of point-of-sale printers in restaurants around the world began behaving strangely. Some churned out bizarre pictures of computers and giant robots signed, “with love from the hacker God himself”. Some informed their owners that, “YOUR PRINTER HAS BEEN PWND’D”. Some told them, “For the love of God, please close this port”. When the hacker God gave an interview to Motherboard, a technology website, he claimed to be a British secondary-school pupil by the name of “Stackoverflowin”. Annoyed by the parlous state of computer security, he had, he claimed, decided to perform a public service by demonstrating just how easy it was to seize control.

Not all hackers are so public-spirited, and 2016 was a bonanza for those who are not. In February of that year cyber-crooks stole $81m directly from the central bank of Bangladesh—and would have got away with more were it not for a crucial typo. In August America’s National Security Agency (NSA) saw its own hacking tools leaked all over the internet by a group calling themselves the Shadow Brokers. (The CIA suffered a similar indignity this March.) In October a piece of software called Mirai was used to flood Dyn, an internet infrastructure company, with so much meaningless traffic that websites such as Twitter and Reddit were made inaccessible to many users. And the hacking of the Democratic National Committee’s e-mail servers and the subsequent leaking of embarrassing communications seems to have been part of an attempt to influence the outcome of the American elections.

Away from matters of great scale and grand strategy, most hacking is either show-off vandalism or simply criminal. It is also increasingly easy. Obscure forums oil the trade in stolen credit-card details, sold in batches of thousands at a time. Data-dealers hawk “exploits”: flaws in code that allow malicious attackers to subvert systems. You can also buy “ransomware”, with which to encrypt photos and documents on victims’ computers before charging them for the key that will unscramble the data. So sophisticated are these facilitating markets that coding skills are now entirely optional. Botnets—flocks of compromised computers created by software like Mirai, which can then be used to flood websites with traffic, knocking them offline until a ransom is paid—can be rented by the hour. Just like a legitimate business, the bot-herders will, for a few dollars extra, provide technical support if anything goes wrong.

The total cost of all this hacking is anyone’s guess (most small attacks, and many big ones, go unreported). But all agree it is likely to rise because the scope for malice is about to expand remarkably. “We are building a world-sized robot,” says Bruce Schneier, a security analyst, in the shape of the “Internet of Things”. The IoT is a buzz-phrase used to describe the computerization of everything from cars and electricity meters to children’s toys, medical devices, and light bulbs. In 2015 a group of computer-security researchers demonstrated that it was possible to take remote control of certain Jeep cars. When the Mirai malware is used to build a botnet it seeks out devices such as video recorders and webcams; the botnet for fridges is just around the corner.

Cloze Test
In the passage given below there are 5 blanks, each followed by a word given in bold. Even blank has four alternative words given in options (A),(B),(C) and (D). You have to tell which word will best suit the respective blank. Mark (E) as your answer if the work given in bold after the blank is your answer i.e “No change required”.

TRAVELLERS sometimes have to show their travel documents five times when (1)___ [flying] a flight: at check-in, at security, then occasionally at outbound immigration, before another check when boarding. Finally, there is passport control at the destination. Each is a potential queue. So regular flyers will be interested in anything that might speed up the process.

One answer could be facial-recognition technology. In the past few weeks, a number of airports have begun to introduce a system that will (2)__ [adapt] faces, match them with electronic passport photos, and allow those passengers it (3)__ [rectifies] to skip lines.

In Tokyo, the government has been (4)__ [observing] facial-recognition technology in two airports since 2014. It hopes to introduce the system in full in time for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. In France, Groupe ADP, which operates Charles De Gaulle airport in Paris, began testing similar software in February. Queues at the airport have doubled since new security measures were introduced after terrorist attacks in 2015; this, thinks ADP, might be one way to (5)___ [leisure] the pain. In Canada, meanwhile, plans are in place to start rolling out facial-recognition kiosks this spring. Similar trials have also been announced in Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam.

Reasoning

Reasoning section consists of 35 questions carrying 35 marks. In today’s exam, questions were asked from the following topics:-

  • Puzzles and Seating Arrangement- 4 puzzles
  • Inequalities-5 Questions (3 direct and 2 individual questions)
  • Miscellaneous -2 from Blood Relation, 2 from order and Ranking, 1 from coding-decoding, 2 from direction sense.

Seating arrangements asked was of Single Line arrangement in which 8 people facing North having birthdays on various dates.

Quantitative Aptitude

  • Quadratic Equation: 5 Questions of Easy level
  • Data Interpretation: 2 sets (Tabular and line graph)
  • Approximation: 5 Questions (Moderate level)
  • Miscellaneous: 10 Questions
  • Number Series- 5 Questions of Easy level

Following are the missing number series asked in the 4th slots of 7th May 2017.

17 , 7.5 , 5.5 , 7 , 20 , ?

Following are the missing number series asked in the 1st slots of 6th May 2017.

  • 3,10,20,39,85,?
  • 4,31,156,499,1228,?
  • 152,156,140,176,112,?
  • 79, 21,67,273,?

Following are the missing number series asked in the three slots of 29th May 2017.

  1. 77   85   69   101   37   ?
  2. 14   8   9   14.5   30  ?
  3. 7   8   18   57   ?   1165
  4. 5   7   18   47   103   ?
  5. 20   29   54   103   184   ?
  6. 16 25 50 99 180 ?
  7. 4 7 17 41 86 ?
  8. 12 7 8 13 27 ?
  9. 6 7 16 51 ? 1045
  10. 72 79 65 93 37 ?
  11. 16   9   10   16   33   ?
  12. 5   6   14   25   ?   925
  13. 3   6   17   44   95   ?
  14. 65   74   56   92   20   ?
  15. 5   24   49   98   179   ?

Safe Attempts

Subject

Total Questions

Good Attempts

English

30

18-20

Reasoning

35

15-18

Quantitative Aptitude

35

19-20

Total

100

55-60

Last Year’s cut off

SBI PO 2016 Prelims sectional Cutoff is as given Below:

Name of Section

Total Marks

Sectional Cutoff (SC/ST/OBC/VH/OH)

Sectional Cutoff (General)

English Language

30

6.00

8.75

Reasoning Ability

35

4.25

7.00

Quantitative Aptitude

35

4.25

7.25

SBI PO 2016 Prelims overall Cutoff  is as given Below:

General – 47.5

  • OBC – 44.5
  • SC- 38.75
  • ST- 29.25
  • VH- 37
  • OH- 36
  • HI- 15.75

Expected Cut off for 2017

It is quite early to predict cut off as there are many shifts to be held in upcoming days, but looking at the pattern and level of the questions, we can have a rough idea about the prelims cut off 2017.

Name of Section

Expected Cutoff

Reasoning Ability

9 - 10

English Language

8- 10

Quantitative Aptitude

10-12

Overall Expected Cutoff

 48-53

SBI PO Prelims 2017 Exam Difficulty Level

Name of Section

Difficulty Level

Reasoning Ability

Moderate to Difficult

English Language

Moderate

Quantitative Aptitude

Moderate

Overall

Moderate to Difficult

Add Your Comment

Comments (0)
Logo
Gear up for your career goal with WiFiStudy app

Do Apne Sapno ko Udaan

Install